How Does a Backup Generator Work?

Tens of millions of homes are affected by power outages in the United States every year. Most of that damage is done during heat waves due to excessive electricity use and during inclement weather.

The solution to ensuring that you have days of self-sustaining power during adverse electrical conditions is to invest in a backup generator. But how does a backup generator work?

Below, we share the steps that go into picking out a home generator, selecting from various fuel sources, hooking generators into your home, and letting them work their magic. Keep reading to learn more!

Picking up and Fueling up Your Device

Before a generator has the opportunity to work, you need to look up in stock generators, pick one out, and fuel it up. Those steps can create some “analysis paralysis”, mostly because of fuel choices.

Backup generators can run on solar, standard gasoline, diesel fuel, and even on your home’s natural gas. Our recommendation is to invest in a generator that leverages external fuel in case your home gas lines go down alongside your electricity during a disaster.

Hooking Your Generator to Your Transfer Switch

Once your generator is bought and fueled, head over to your home’s circuit breaker. There, you should find a transfer switch.

Hooking your generator into your home’s transfer switch is the only safe way to hardwire your generator into your home’s power. Once it’s hooked in, your generator should take notice by beginning to warm up.

Transfer Switches Draft Generator Assistance

Now to the core of our how does a backup generator work question…

When your power goes out, within seconds, your transfer switch senses the disruption. Upon taking notice, your transfer switch will alert your backup generator (which it’s hooked into it) and your generator will then power on fully to start providing electricity to your home.

Your generator should be able to continue servicing your electricity needs until power is restored from your city’s lines or until it runs out of fuel.

Required Maintenance

For your generator to consistently step in during electrical emergencies, maintenance is required. This includes getting asked to change its oil, spark plugs, and air filter.

Your generator should be able to continue servicing your electricity needs until power gets restored from your city’s lines or until it runs out of fuel.

Your How Does a Backup Generator Work Questions – Answered

We all know that generators have the ability to provide electricity when grids go down. When it comes to the specific question of “how does a backup generator work” though, most get left in the dark.

We hope the insight we’ve provided has given you a peek into generator installation, power sources, and more. Our team also hopes you leave this post inspired to pick up a backup generator of your own. That way, you’re prepared the next time your community is without power.

For more information on all things real estate, we welcome you to explore more content on our blog!

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